HD Retrovision Announce HDTV Super Nintendo & Sega Mega Drive / Genesis Component Cables

HD-Retrovision-MD-and-SNES-Component-CablesThe thought of using modern TVs to feed our retro gaming addiction is something many will cringe at. The lack of fidelity in visuals, occasional lag and sometimes seeing no picture all together is enough to leave gamers sticking beside their trusty CRTs. That said, a newly formed accessory manufacturer may finally have the solution to enjoying all the classics on flat screen monitors.

Although they’re yet to be released, HD Retrovision’s upcoming Super Nintendo and Sega Mega Drive / Genesis Component cables have many gearing up to ditch their monstrous television sets. These new offerings allow classic 16-bit systems to be run on modern displays with absolutely no niggles at all - and of course an improved picture.

Over at HD Retrovision’s website are various comparisons showcasing the difference gamers will soon be experiencing, along with more technical details behind the creation of these new cables. While it’s unlikely that those infatuated with RGB output will make the move, those of you who have been making do with blurry pictures on flat screen televisions should definitely consider the upgrade to component.

HD Retrovision are hoping to launch a Kickstarter project this weekend to help fund the production of these cables, along with the potential bonus of Sega Dreamcast component cables being made available should the demand be there.

HD Retrovision’s Component Cables in action

Link: HD Retrovision’s Official Website


Kickstarter Update

HD Retrovision have finally launched their Kickstarter, allowing those eager to secure their HDTV cables the chance to do so. Costing $35 per cable along with various other perks available, HD Retrovision are looking for $25,000 in funding over the next month.

Link: Sega Genesis and Super Nintendo Component Cables on Kickstarter


Last Updated ( 02 November 2014 )  

Cauterize

Better known as Adam offline, Cauterize is one of RetroCollect's final bosses with an unhealthy addiction to pixels. When he's not out searching the web for the latest retro gaming news or creating content for RetroCollect, he'll will most likely be found working on his Sensible Soccer skills.

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Comments 

(Link to this comment) Firthy2002 2014-10-28 16:41
My interest is piqued!
(Link to this comment) Lorfarius 2014-10-28 17:36
Simple idea but genius!
+1 (Link to this comment) espontaneo 2014-10-28 17:48
This is pretty misleading, notice how they compare only composite to the cables and not rgb scart? That's because all the cables are is RGB over component so will not be any better than an RGB scart (for Americans without scart I suppose they are useful) but you'll still get distortion and artefacts on an modern TV because the cables don't upscale and most tvs are simply really bad at scaling. Also many tvs simply won't support 240p over component to begin with,.so this is not the answer it claims to be. They point out that you can already buy devices that do this but that theirs is special (because magic?) Another borderline scammy kickstarter.
(Link to this comment) Ryooshi 2014-10-29 00:24
Quoting espontaneo:
This is pretty misleading, notice how they compare only composite to the cables and not rgb scart?


I'll have to disagree with you espontaneo. I live and grew up in the US with these systems and never used a SCART connector on any AV equipment I've owned. Comparing their cable to composite, to me, is the most obvious common point of references for many US gamers.

However, I was curious about your point and after looking at HD Retrovision's FAQs section, they do address the use of SCART: www.hdretrovision.com/faq/"How is this any different than using an RGB SCART cable and a SCART to YPbPr adapter?" Perhaps you can find some more satisfying information on their website, you seem to know quite a bit about console video outputs. Have you considered contacting the makers about your concerns? I'm sure others would be interested to get some clarification on these matters.
+1 (Link to this comment) Welshwuff 2014-10-28 19:31
Good news for americans who cant use scart.
+2 (Link to this comment) BuckoA51 2014-10-28 20:18
"These new offerings allow classic 16-bit systems to be run on modern displays with absolutely no niggles at all - and of course an improved picture." Err no, that's completely false. It's just a transcoder in a cable. Your TVs still going to butcher that 240p image and try to deinterlace it. This is no way a "solution to enjoying all the classics on flat screen monitors."

I agree with Espontaneo this is a borderline scam. "HD" cables indeed.
(Link to this comment) Ryooshi 2014-10-29 00:21
Quoting BuckoA51:
"...This is no way a "solution to enjoying all the classics on flat screen monitors."

I agree with Espontaneo this is a borderline scam. "HD" cables indeed.


I don't see how either you or espontaneo can call this product a "scam." The business, HD Retrovision, does not call their cables "HD" or any such things, they primarily refer to them as component cables. The author of this piece calls the product "High Definition Cables" in the article title, but not the creators.

Also, this product is a solution to connecting older consoles to modern displays, in a manner that appears to maintain the integrity of the original video output, far better than the original composite connection.
+1 (Link to this comment) BuckoA51 2014-10-29 10:04
The business, HD Retrovision, does not call their cables "HD"

Lol, I think you hit the nail on the head pretty well there. I mean if this isn't misleading why has it clearly mislead Cauterize when he originally wrote the article? It's like setting up a business calling yourself "Super Gaming PCs inc" then selling slow computers. "Sorry mate, we never said the actual computer was a super gaming PC, that's just a company name".
(Link to this comment) espontaneo 2014-10-29 12:30
1: They may not call them HD cables but they call themselves HD retrovision and have only two products. Non HD cables.

2. Many TVs will not except 240p over component. They mention this in their faq and say it's only a problem with older TVs (so just buy a new TV, right?). As far as I understand this is just not true as the format is considered obsolete, new TVs simply are not required to support it and probably don't even consider it (240p over component).

3. The screen shots show crisp clear graphics when in fact many TVs will badly scale the picture and create colour errors like cross hatching and striping and edge artifacts. While it will be a lot better than composite, it will not look like in the example pictures.They of course claim to "condition", the signal. However as it is the scaling hardware of TVs that seems to cause all the problems not the signal itself I doubt this claim.

Anyway, backer beware!
(Link to this comment) Ryooshi 2014-10-29 23:58
Quoting BuckoA51:
It's like setting up a business calling yourself "Super Gaming PCs inc" then selling slow computers....


The author has since revised the title of the article, interpret this action as you will.

As far as the business name goes, HD Retrovision, I don't see it as misleading. The company offers products to connect 'retro' gaming consoles to HDTVs, they even make this point themselves on their website. The use of "HD" in (US) English, especially in marketing, is so pervasive that you can buy 'HD printer paper,' 'HD speaker wire,' and probably HD grapefruit... In other words, I think their use is as valid as any other common place usage nowadays.

That being said, I can understand your confusion and potential discomfort with the name. If they do offer additional cables/devices in future, such as an SNES to HDMI box (not saying they have made such a claim), then their name would be further validated.
(Link to this comment) mickcris 2014-10-29 15:59
They do call them HD component cables 16 seconds into the youtube video

edit:
never mind, i had annotations off. I see they put up a disclaimer on that saying that's not what they meant. lol.
(Link to this comment) espontaneo 2014-10-29 16:00
If you want to test if this will even work on your TV, you can. If you have a ps2 with component try a 240p game (Ico caused this for me the first time which is how I found out about this problem) (google for other games). If you have a Wii with component then you can put virtual console in 240p and see if that works or try Zelda 1 from the collectors edition.
(Link to this comment) Turkish 2014-10-31 09:24
So, I should NOT buy one of these...?
+1 (Link to this comment) BuckoA51 2014-10-31 11:21
Quoting Turkish:
So, I should NOT buy one of these...?


Do you want to connect to a US CRT that has component but no SCART/RGB? - Then yes, these would be ideal.

Do you want to connect to a HDTV? - Buy a Framemeister.

Want to connect to an upscaler such as a Framemeister - Buy RGB SCART cables.

Can't afford a Framemeister? - Buy a CRT.

Can't afford a Framemeister and wife/partner won't let you have a CRT - Use an emulator

Can't afford a Framemeister and wife/partner won't let you have a CRT and have some objection against emulators AND your HDTV doesn't have SCART - This is better than using a composite cable but far from ideal.
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